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Young Rory to benefit

PUBLISHED: 21:45 05 March 2002 | UPDATED: 11:29 03 March 2010

YOUNG Rory Noble is an inspiration.

Now, as wheelchair-bound Rory continues his battle to lead a normal life, his fight has been given an extra boost by nursery school children in Ipswich.

YOUNG Rory Noble is an inspiration.

Now, as wheelchair-bound Rory continues his battle to lead a normal life, his fight has been given an extra boost by nursery school children in Ipswich.

The seven-year-old, who attends Heathside School, suffers from Angelman Syndrome, a genetic disorder, which means he has speech impairment and cannot walk unaided.

Thanks to the pupils of Heath Nursery School in Crofton Road Rory has the use of a walker, which means he is able to move around the school almost by himself – and the smiling boy has fellow school children to thank.

Youngsters at the school raised more than £60 to help buy a new set of wheels for the walker by collecting pennies in their school lunch hour.

The money, collected between September and December, was donated to Disability Care Enterprise (DCE) to be spent of the new wheels.

Three children from Heath Nursery School, Ellisse Morey, Katie Grogan and Charlie Fulcher, all aged four, joined headteacher Liz Miller as special guests at a school assembly to have a look at Rory in his new walker.

The wheels, which cost around £70, are fitted with a special brake, which prevents Rory from sliding around when he needs to stand still.

DCE'S Carolyn Morey said: "It's a tremendous effort from all the children involved and great that children from a school from just down the road were willing to help children less fortunate than themselves."

Heathside's Sarah Pells added that the walker was an invaluable piece of equipment, which will be a tremendous help to Rory.

She said: "It means he can move and walk around where otherwise he would be standing still. He can move around in the playground and he is now able to explore without having to have someone push him."

Angelman Syndrome was diagnosed by Dr Harry Angelman in 1965 and it is believed thousands of Angelman cases have gone undiagnosed or misdiagnosed as cerebral palsy, autism or other childhood disorders.

Consistent symptoms of the disease are development delay, a shaking of the arms and legs and unique behaviour such as hand flapping movements or a short attention span.

WEBLINK

www.angelman.org


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