Zoe gets gold again

A GIRL who has bravely fought adversity to become a medal winning sports champion has gone for gold yet again.Zoe Newson, 14, of Askins Road, East Bergholt, came home from the 2007 National Dwarf Games with eight gold and silver medals in basketball, football, hockey, running, shot and discus.

A GIRL who has bravely fought adversity to become a medal winning sports champion has gone for gold yet again.

Zoe Newson, 14, of Askins Road, East Bergholt, came home from the 2007 National Dwarf Games with eight gold and silver medals in basketball, football, hockey, running, shot and discus.

Zoe has Achondroplasia, (also known as dwarfism) which, is a genetic disorder which causes short stature. Those with the condition normally reach an average height of no more than 4ft, or 1.2 metres.

However, despite her condition, nothing has stood in Zoe's way when it comes to living her life to the full and if there's something she wants, she will go out and get it.

Just like her two twin brothers and parents, Zoe is a sports fanatic, so on May 4 she travelled up to Alexander Stadium in Birmingham to take part in the games.

Zoe's mum, Helen Newson, 42, said: “Nothing really gets in her way.

Most Read

“She's very stubborn but she needs to be to get by in everyday life.

“She just doesn't give in. There's an electric wheel chair that she can use at school but she doesn't use it because she doesn't want to be different to anyone else.”

Zoe in many respects is just like any other popular teenager and her mum says she has never let her height or her condition stop her from doing what she wants to do in life.

Mrs Newson said: “If there's something she wants to do then she will do it, but if there's something she doesn't want to do she won't!

“As long as she's happy I don't really mind what she does.

“She's just got on with it. She never really complains. I think she's a very brave and clever little girl really.”

Zoe was recently offered a potentially life changing series of operations to lengthen her arms and legs but she declined, deciding instead that she's happy just the way she is.

Despite the many difficulties associated with dwarfism, such as sinus and ear problems, excessive tiredness as well as the social stigma attached to being an abnormal height, Zoe has proved that you can be a sporting hero no matter what difficulties you have to overcome.

Have you got an inspirational story to tell? Write to Your Letters, Evening Star, 30 Lower Brook Street, Ipswich, IP4 1AN, or e-mail eveningstarletters@eveningstar.co.uk.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter