Phoenix Black Belts impress

PHOENIX Black Belt School further strengthened its reputation as a 21st century martial arts club with an impressive performance at a new Olympic style competition.

BY STUART WATSON

stuart.watson@archant.co.uk

PHOENIX Black Belt School further strengthened its reputation as a 21st century martial arts club with an impressive performance at a new Olympic style competition.

The Ipswich-based club's chief instructor Wayne Jordan is a firm advocate that martial arts needs to be taught in a way that is useful in modern society.

And after having his own unique new style - name Universal Fighting Concepts - ratified by the Black Belt International organisation, he was quick to put the all-round skill of his pupils into practise at a new multi-discipline event.

The Malympex - standing for the Martial Arts Olympics - sees competitors represent their local area, with teams accumulating points over various disciplines over numerous rounds.

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Representing Ipswich, Phoenix Black Belt students returned from the Stoke Mandeville Centre in Buckinghamshire with an impressive tally of eight medals, including five golds.

All competed for individual titles, with instructors Wayne Jordan and Andrew Offord, as well as 15 year-old Reece Johnson all winning gold medals in their respective divisions.

There were also some good displays from Charlotte Price (silver), Tim Johnson (fifth place) and nine year-old Joshua Skillern who claimed two bronze medals.

It was an extra special weekend for Johnson as he also passed his junior coaching exam with distinction.

Jordan said: “We are very pleased with how the weekend went. I'm proud of everybody who took part, they performed exceptionally well and the results are proof of that.”

Jordan is a firm believer of rigorous training methods that will teach key life skills as well as the technical aspects of the sport.

The revolutionary instructor is now hoping his training methods can inspire others to follow suit in adapting to change. He said: “The whole martial arts world has changed big time over the past few years. I feel things are moving away from the traditional stuff and that people are looking more for the reality side of things now.”

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