Acid-tongued Carr is a natural comic

GALLERY Jimmy Carr comes with a warning. If you are easily offended - or even if you're not that easily offended - it's probably best you avoid this controversial comic like the plague.

Josh Warwick

JIMMY Carr comes with a warning. If you are easily offended - or even if you're not that easily offended - it's probably best you avoid this controversial comic like the plague.

In fact, last night's sell-out performance was, according to the show's promoters, suitable only for those lacking a moral compass.

No subject was considered taboo, indeed any issue which could cause gasps was heartily mopped up, twisted and spat out in Carr's unique, public schoolboy style.

Race, gypsies, paedophilia, obesity…nothing was off limit, as Carr, in his decidedly deadpan fashion rattled off inappropriate gag after inappropriate gag.

Born in Buckinghamshire, educated at Cambridge and unashamedly middle class, Carr is an intelligent performer.

Most Read

Branded a “comedy hero for our times” by the Guardian and “world class” by the Independent, he has established himself as one of the country's biggest acts.

His television work, which includes Eight Out of Ten Cats and Channel Four's 100 Greatest series, has transformed him from Edinburgh Fringe favourite to household name.

And his near-meteoric rise is all the more remarkable because of his non-PC approach (some of his jokes would make Roy Chubby Brown squirm uncomfortably in his seat).

He sits with Ricky Gervais at the top of the British comedy scene, although last night's polished offering was far superior to his peer's performance at the Regent in 2007.

Carr is slick, perfectly prepared and has a natural talent for stand up.

At times the one-liners fly off at a relentless pace.

He ponders how rude the cartoon character Asterix's real name could possibly be, asks whether flip-flops are actually called flop-flips when walking backwards, wonders if gypsies go on caravan holidays and churns out umpteen more jokes far too naughty to publish.

His ability to ad-lib is also striking. Much of the show is filled with audience participation, Carr's razor-sharp wit turning questions and heckles into cracking retorts.

Carr sails agonisingly close to the wind but gets away with much of his material through his veil of irony - this is not Jim Davidson right wing waffle, after all.

His cool, sophistication and subtle mannerisms reassure the audience he doesn't really believe the shocking words which fly from his acid tongue.

If edgy humour isn't your thing, then stay away, but for those who enjoy having their morality veritably tampered with - and their funny bones tickled - Jimmy Carr could just be your man.

Josh Warwick

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter