Do you recognise these old Tolly Cobbold pubs?

Tolly Cobbold Brewery in 1999 Picture: PAUL NIXON

Tolly Cobbold Brewery in 1999, before it closed down permanetly in 2002 - Credit: PAUL NIXON

The Ipswich waterfront was once home to a brewery that supplied beer to watering houses around the county. 

Beginning in 1746 and continuing for more than 250 years, at first Cobbold, and then Tolly Cobbold brewed beer that kept booze flowing at hundreds of pubs across the counties of Suffolk and Essex.

Formed from the merger of the Tollymarche and Cobbold breweries in 1957, the company brewed its beer at Cliff Brewery on the waterfront. 

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Cliff Brewery, as it stood in 2015 before it was severely damaged in a fire - Credit: Sarah Lucy brown

While the building was badly damaged by a fire in 2020, the former Cliff Brewery is set to be converted into a care home

An outside view of the Ship Launch pub Picture: ARCHANT

An outside view of the Ship Launch pub Picture: ARCHANT - Credit: Archant

Tolly Cobbold ran popular pubs in Ipswich including the Ship Launch, which was located near to the brewery on the north side of the waterfront and mainly served dock workers, and the Old Bell Inn, which was located next to Stoke Bridge. 

The bar staff ready to pull pints at the Ship Launch pub in 1974 Picture: ARCHANT

The bar staff ready to pull pints at the Ship Launch pub in 1974 Picture: ARCHANT - Credit: Archant

Some of the company's Ipswich pubs, built as part of a large expansion during the 1930s, were known as Tolly Follies. These were built in a mock baronial style and had distinct chimneys. 

The Cricketers, the Golden Hind, and the Suffolk Punch are all examples of Tolly Follies.

The Millers Arms closed in 1936, but the Cricketers remains

The Millers Arms closed in 1936, but the Cricketers remains - Credit: Archant

Some of the breweries other pubs in the town survived after Tolly Cobbold, with new owners taking them on.

New Cut West, Ipswich, in June 1948, with the Steam Boat Tavern at the corner of Felaw Street. Did y

New Cut West, Ipswich, in June 1948, with the Steam Boat Tavern at the corner of Felaw Street. Did you live in the now demolished houses in the background. - Credit: Archant

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These included the Case is Altered in Woodbridge Road, the Dove in St Helen's Street, the Steam Boat Tavern in New Cut East, and the Woolpack in Tuddenham Road.

TOLLY COBBOLD BREWERYWOOLPACK PUBPATRICK COBBOLD rightLANDLORD PETER LOCKWOOD AND GROOM TONY M

Landlord Peter Lockwood and Groom Tony Moore outside the Woolpack in Ipswich in 1990 - Credit: Archant

The brewery also ran pubs in the surrounding towns — including thirteen in Woodbridge at its peak.

GlossyRichardThe Kings Head, WoodbridgePic Lucy TAylor

The Kings Head in Woodbridge is now owned by Tolly Cobbolds former rival Adnams. - Credit: Lucy Taylor

Some of these — including the Anchor, Cherry Tree, Angel, and Kings Head — still exist, while others like the Royal Oak, Queens Head, and Prince of Wales have closed. 

Folk night at the Brantham Bull, April 1972. ; Neg 28502

Crowds enjoying a folk night at the Brantham Bull in April 1972 - Credit: Archant

Other well-known pubs operated by the brewery included the Fludyer's Arms and Ferryboat in Felixstowe, the Beehive Inn in East Bergholt, and the Brantham Bull. 

Do you have any memories of the old Tolly Cobbold pubs? Contact me at Timothy.Bradford@archant.co.uk