75 times with important gift

PENSIONER Norman Freyett may have been giving blood since the 1960s but it was the death of his wife which made him realise the importance of his gift.

PENSIONER Norman Freyett may have been giving blood since the 1960s but it was the death of his wife which made him realise the importance of his gift.

The 63-year-old has recently given his 75th blood donation but said it was not until his wife was ill in 2004 that he knew how vital giving blood is.

Mr Freyett said, “You hear of people needing blood but it wasn't until I saw it being transfused I realised just how vital my blood donations have been.”

He had lost his wife, Jenny, due to cancer in 2004 and whilst in hospital she was given many blood transfusions, which gave them more time together.


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Mr Freyett, of Bredfield Road, Melton, added: “Giving blood has never really bothered me and nowadays you hardly feel a thing.

“You meet some great people at the sessions who are all just there to help other people - its just like a little club.”

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The retired BT engineer was given an engraved crystal plate at Woodbridge Community Hall to celebrate his 75th donation.

Figures from the National Blood Service reveal that everyday across Suffolk 60 people owe their lives to volunteer blood donors.

Hospitals across England and north Wales need 8000 units of blood in order to keep the blood banks fully filled, so, every donation that's given everyday locally enables the NBS to reach the 8000 units required.

Gareth Bell, spokesman for the National Blood Service in Suffolk said: “Mr Freyett has joined a very select group of less than three per cent of blood donors.

“There are not many people like Mr Freyett who can say they have helped to save the life of 225 people.”

“On behalf of the service, and all the patients Mr Freyett has helped by and saved by giving blood, I would like to offer my sincere thanks.”

There are up to 15 per cent of donors who are unable to donate blood a year because of their age, health or because of their relocation, so more people are wanted to come forward in order that the blood stocks stay strong.

Anyone between the ages 17-59 with good health and weighs over 7st 12lbs can begin to give blood. However, regular blood donors can continue to give blood up to the age of 70.

The process of blood donation takes approximately an hour and by booking an appointment the waiting time is shortened.

To book an appointment or if you want to find out more about blood donation, please contact the NBS helpline on 0845 7 711 711. Or you can also visit www.blood.co.uk.

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