Antique clock failed to attract bidders

A GRANDFATHER clock made in Ipswich more than 200 years ago remains unsold today after bidders failed to reach the asking price at a famous auction house.

A GRANDFATHER clock made in Ipswich more than 200 years ago remains unsold today after bidders failed to reach the asking price at a famous auction house.

Despite a bid of £2,200, the historic George III timepiece did not attract its asking price at Christie's in London.

The longcase mahogany clock, made in or around 1780 by Nathaniel Cavell, was expected to fetch between £3,000 and £5,000.

A spokeswoman for Christie's would not disclose the reserve price or details of the seller.

Mr Cavell originally ran his business in Tavern Street, opposite The Great White Horse, before moving to the Butter Market, where it is thought the striking longcase clock was made.

Born in or around 1749, Mr Cavell died at a young age on January 23, 1789. He and his wife, Caroline, had six children, but four of them died in infancy, a common occurrence in the 18th century.

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In 1782 and 1788, Cavell was brought in to repair the St Mary-le-Tower church clock in Tower Street.

When Cavell died, his wife briefly ran the business before selling the stock at auction, which she advertised in the Ipswich Journal on November 7, 1789.

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