Asbo breaches on the up

SUFFOLK’S troublemakers have breached anti-social behaviour orders 175 times in the past two years – nearly twice the number of orders made.However, a senior police officer in the county today emphasised the value of the orders and maintained they were a success in curbing nuisance behaviour.

SUFFOLK'S troublemakers have breached anti-social behaviour orders 175 times in the past two years - nearly twice the number of orders made.

However, a senior police officer in the county today emphasised the value of the orders and maintained they were a success in curbing nuisance behaviour.

Crime reduction officer inspector Ben Cook, based at Suffolk police headquarters, said: “They are another opportunity to try to control and restrict a person's behaviour so it doesn't impact on the quality of life of individuals.

“Over the two-year period, it seems a big number of breaches, but when you think about the fact that each individual has the opportunity every minute of every day to breach their anti-social behaviour order it is an infrequent event. From that point of view we do find them successful. We know it works.


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“Lots of people try to say anti-social behaviour orders are not working but they most certainly work. For a lot of people it's the wake up call that makes them recognise what they are doing is having a detrimental impact on the community.

“A lot of breaches may be seen as negative, but we are aware of them and it gives us the opportunity to deal with them.

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“Any number of breaches are always a disappointment, but when you look at the reasons why people have these things they are acting in a manner that is anti-social and upsetting communities. When you look at they type of people they are, they are always susceptible to re-offending.”

It has emerged that 93 asbos and crasbos (criminal anti-social behaviour orders) were meted out to the county's nuisances and yobs between June 2005 and June 2007.

The figures were obtained by The Evening Star after a request under the Freedom of Information Act.

The 175 breaches in two years show a marked escalation on figures for the period between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2005.

According to new government figures released after a question tabled in the House of Commons, there were just 63 breaches in Suffolk during those three years, compared with nearly three times as many from June 2005 to June 2007.

Currently in Suffolk there are 45 people subject to Asbos. There are 38 adults and seven aged 17 or under. Thirty eight of the orders relate to males and seven to females.

In addition there are 48 Crasbos split between 30 adults and 18 juveniles. These relate to 44 males and four females.

Do Asbos work? How should police deal with offenders who breach them? Write to Your Letters, Evening Star, 30 Lower Brook Street, Ipswich, IP4 1AN or send an e-mail to eveningstarletters@eveningstar.co.uk

Anti-social behaviour orders (Asbos) can be applied for when evidence against the individual is not necessarily criminal but is anti-social.

The case is presented at a magistrates' court whilst they are acting in a civil capacity.

If granted, the asbo will last for a minimum of two years. The individual subject of the asbo will have a set of prohibitions unique to the case to prevent the anti-social behaviour re-occurring and protect the community.

If an individual breaches any of these prohibitions it then becomes a criminal matter and is dealt with as such by the courts. A breach is an arrestable offence and carries a maximum five year sentence for adults and a maximum two year sentence for juveniles.

Criminal anti-social behaviour orders (Crasbos) are anti social behaviour orders made on conviction. The order is made at the time of sentencing and should not be adjourned and dealt with separately from the sentencing.

The individual subject of the crasbo will have a set of prohibitions unique to the case to prevent the anti-social behaviour re-occurring and protect the community from such acts.

If an individual breaches any of these prohibitions it then becomes a criminal matter and is dealt with as such by the courts. A breach is an arrestable offence and carries maximum 5 year sentence for adults and a maximum 2 year sentence for juveniles.

There is no difference in the result of an asbo and a crasbo. The only difference is the method in obtaining them.

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