BBC’s Great Pottery Throw Down winner Ryan Barrett from Ipswich delighted show reached so many

Ryan Barrett in action during this year's Great Pottery Throw Down. Picture: Love Productions/BBC/PA

Ryan Barrett in action during this year's Great Pottery Throw Down. Picture: Love Productions/BBC/PA Wire - Credit: PA

The winner of the Great Pottery Throw Down says he has no intentions of becoming “super famous” – and just wants to carry on enjoying ceramics.

Ryan Barrett with Great Pottery Throw Down judge Kate Malone

Ryan Barrett with Great Pottery Throw Down judge Kate Malone - Credit: Archant

Ryan Barrett, originally from Ipswich, clinched the show’s title in Thursday night’s final episode.

The model had to keep the result under wraps for around three months – filming finished last year – before being able to enjoy watching the result on TV with friends, family and the show’s other contestants.

Mr Barrett said he enjoyed taking part in the show, presented by Sara Cox on BBC Two, but was surprised by the intensity of it all when he started out.

Ryan Barrett from Ipswich, right, before he was crowned winner of The Great Pottery Throw Down. Pict

Ryan Barrett from Ipswich, right, before he was crowned winner of The Great Pottery Throw Down. Pictured with fellow finalists Clover Lee and Richard Parker. Picture: Love Productions/BBC/PA - Credit: PA

“The first episode was overwhelming with the camera and the lights but the pressure and the build up isn’t really shown as much on the cameras.

“You’re pushing your limits and because is a competition.

“I definitely had some moments of bad days and good days. When things do go wrong they go drastically wrong.”

The 31-year-old, a former Chantry High School and Suffolk New College student, added he had “made some amazing friends” through the show and planned to continue his ceramics.

Mr Barrett, who installed his first wheel and kiln in his grandma Josie’s shed around two years ago, said since the show started he has been asked to do some commissions and even opened a store in London before the final was aired.

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He is also pleased about how the show has opened up his hobby to a new audience.

Ryan Barrett during filming for the Great Pottery Throw Down. Picture: Love Productions/BBC/PA Wire

Ryan Barrett during filming for the Great Pottery Throw Down. Picture: Love Productions/BBC/PA Wire - Credit: PA

“It’s reached out to so many different people. It’s all about being creative,” he said.

To anyone interested in taking up the past time he added: “There’s a lot of classes where you can just get a taster which are really good and if you like it just do it. I think it’s the best way to get involved.”

Mr Barrett said he would consider returning to the show in another capacity if asked, or doing something similar, as a result of his success – but was adamant he didn’t want it to spoil his hobby.

“I’d definitely consider it. It depends on what it is. I have no intentions to become super famous.

“I made that mistake a bit with photography and I sort of lost the interest. I don’t want to lose that with ceramics.

“I really love making ceramics and don’t want to lose that.”