Blueprint for future to be discussed

IPSWICH people are to be asked about ideas for new policy which will guide the development of Ipswich over the next 20 years.The Borough Council has produced its "preferred options" for the Local Development Framework which set out what it believes the town needs to further prosper.

IPSWICH people are to be asked about ideas for new policy which will guide the development of Ipswich over the next 20 years.

The Borough Council has produced its "preferred options" for the Local Development Framework which set out what it believes the town needs to further prosper.

The ideas will be discussed at meeting of the council's executive on November 19.

If agreed, a new period of consultation will take place in January and February.

The majority of public comments so far involve concerns about the possible development of the “northern fringe” of Ipswich and the issue of whether or not the town needs an east bank link road.

In the "preferred options" policy, the council says that there in no need to build on the northern fringe to meet the government's housing targets for the period to 2021 but that some of the Northern Fringe should be shown as a possible area for future development beyond that date.

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The Council has also decided not to include plans for an east bank link road in the policy.

It argues that no public money would be forthcoming, that there is no guarantee a new A14 junction would be permitted and that private finance would mean more out of town retail space and this could damage the town centre.

Other major issues included in the document include the creation of a green ring around the outside of the town, plans to meet ministers' housing targets by allocating land for 6,800 new homes for Ipswich by 2021 to ensure the overall target of 15,400 new homes is met.

Meanwhile 35 per cent of new developments will be affordable homes. Of

those, at least 65 per cent will be for rent;

The Cranes site in south-east Ipswich becomes a strategic employment site and all major developments must have at least 10 per cent green space;

There will be no more out of town retail parks within the Borough boundary while a proposed wet dock crossing will be supported and transport links between the railway station, the Waterfront and the town centre will be improved;

The Council also believes a possible northern by-pass outside the borough boundary should be properly considered.

Councillor Richard Atkins, responsible for economic development, said: "The 'preferred options' process is both complex and important.

“In essence, it maps out the future direction that Ipswich will take.

“We have tried to meet people's needs and expectations and have made environmental issues a big priority.

“We are pleased that there was such a big public response when we were setting out on this project and we ask that local people and businesses will again get involved.”

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