Boat tragedy woman had been drinking

A 37-YEAR-OLD woman, who drowned after falling into the Broads, had been drinking heavily, an inquest heard.The dangers of drinking alcohol near water was underlined and improved safety measures were called for at the inquest of Lisa Hooper, a graphic designer from Yoxford, who died on July 28.

A 37-YEAR-OLD woman, who drowned after falling into the Broads, had been drinking heavily, an inquest heard.

The dangers of drinking alcohol near water was underlined and improved safety measures were called for at the inquest of Lisa Hooper, a graphic designer from Yoxford, who died on July 28.

The inquestheard Ms Hooper had been enjoying a break on the Broads with her partner, brother Jonathan Hooper and his partner Lynne Deal when the accident happened.

Ms Hooper had been drinking pints of cider during the day before drinking vodka in the evening at the Red House Inn at Cantley, near to where her brother's boat was moored.

A post mortem examination revealed she had 334 milligrams of alcohol in 100 millilitres of blood.

Mr Hooper said the events of the evening were a blur due to the amount of alcohol he had drunk. He said he remembered going back to the Red House Inn after the group had left as he thought Lisa had left her wallet there. It was from the window of the pub that he saw a large group gathered and went back to discover his sister had fallen in the water.

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Ms Deal said she was in bed at the time of the accident. She said she remembered hearing someone stumbling, felt the boat rock, then heard two splashes. She got off the boat and could hear someone in the water. She then dialled 999.

Ms Hooper was later recovered from the River Yare after a search involving emergency services. She was taken to the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital but could not be revived.

Pc Andrew Barkway, who investigated the accident, said regardless of whether someone had consumed alcohol, there was "quite a lot of danger" due to the condition of the mooring which he said needed to be improved.

"It would certainly help if there was lighting, if the bank was somehow stepped and if the grass was levelled," he said.

There could be better provision of lifebelts, he added.

Norwich Coroner William Armstrong recorded a verdict of misadventure.

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