Calls for new town in Suffolk

CALLS for a new town in Suffolk have been made so the county can better accommodate the amount of extra houses being built.Babergh District Councillor John Sayer came up with the idea that Suffolk should have a Milton Keynes or a Welwyn Garden City of its own.

CALLS for a new town in Suffolk have been made so the county can better accommodate the amount of extra houses being built.

Babergh District Councillor John Sayer came up with the idea that Suffolk should have a Milton Keynes or a Welwyn Garden City of its own.

Mr Sayers admits he does not know where the new urban area should go but said it was an idea that needed to be given some serious consideration.

He said: “We can't continue the policy of just building on and on without considering infrastructure.

“Building on towns we have at the moment is not sustainable.

“I've been to visit lots of new towns and I don't see why we can't build one in this area.

Most Read

“If we carry on the way we are some towns will just find themselves merging with villages. I'm sure a lot of people share my concerns.

“It's up to us to make a case to the East of England regional assembly to say we need a containment policy in our towns - and a new one built.

“I think people would want to live in a new town. I think it is an exciting possibility though I know I may be alone on this.”

However a spokesman for the East of England regional assembly said: “The East of England plan does not have any plans for new towns in Suffolk.

“In the future there will be a review of the East of England plan that will look at the new town issue.”

The spokesman suggested interested local authorities could apply to build an eco-town in their area following a new initiative announced by the government at the end of July.

The eco-towns will be small new towns of at least 5,000 to 20,000 homes.

According for the department for communities and local government they are intended to exploit the potential to create a complete new settlement to achieve zero carbon development and more sustainable living using the best new design and architecture.

Does Suffolk need a new town? Where would you like to see and eco-town built? Write to Your Letters, Evening Star, 30 Lower Brook Street, Ipswich IP4 1AN or e-mail eveningstarletters@eveningstar.co.uk.

New Towns

In 1946 it was thought that Great Britain faced a legacy of damaged homes and disrupted industrial infrastructure.

New Towns aimed to improve living and working conditions both in damaged areas and in wholly new settlements.

After the enactment of the New Towns Act 1946 work started on Stevenage, the first New Town.

Of the 11 New Towns designated in Britain between 1946 and 1955, eight were London 'overspill' or satellite towns.

By the late 1950s some of the earliest New Towns were coming to the end of their main development phase.

Together the English New Towns have accommodated more than two million people and provided more than one million jobs.

SOURCE: English Partnerships

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter