Colin's marathon million pound effort

COLIN Carter is one in a million!The 65-year-old has been raising hundreds of thousands of pounds for good causes for 20 years and by running the London Marathon this month he has smashed the £1million barrier.

COLIN Carter is one in a million!

The 65-year-old has been raising hundreds of thousands of pounds for good causes for 20 years and by running the London Marathon this month he has smashed the £1million barrier.

Now Mr Carter, who began fundraising after he discovered his daughter Hannah, now 27, suffered from Rett syndrome, is planning on hanging up his collecting jar after years of hard work.

The Woodbridge-based chairman of haulage company W Carter, said: “I can't remember exactly how much I've raised but it must be more than £1million.

“I ran golf days for 19 years and they brought in up to £106,000 each.

“We found out about Hannah when she was two years old. She can't walk and can't talk and will need 24 hour supervision for the rest of her life.

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“We knew there would never be a cure but I started fundraising to hopefully find a way we could stop it happening.

“Initially most of the money went to the Rett Syndrome Association but so many people supported me I thought I would help other charities too. Anybody who has got a problem I try to help.”

By setting up the golf days at courses in Suffolk dad-of-five Mr Carter was able to buy four yellow buses which can be used by community groups or individuals free of charge.

He has also collected cash for cancer charities and is planning to split the money he collects from his marathon effort, currently £27,000 with more still coming in, between Macmillan and Breakthrough Breast Cancer.

He added: “I snapped my Achilles tendon and decided I wanted to get fit again so I thought I would run the marathon as one last fundraising effort.

“I ran 600 miles throughout training and it was tough at times, but the race was fabulous.

“Twenty years is enough, it all takes a lot of effort.

“I hope I've made a difference; I've fought to make a difference and give money to good causes.

“I'm proud that people have supported me because I couldn't have done it without support. Somebody gave me £1,000 to run the marathon and somebody else £2,500. They put their hands in their pockets.”

Have you raised thousands of pounds for charity? Write to Your Letters, Evening Star, 30 Lower Brook Street, Ipswich IP4 1AN or e-mail eveningstarletters@eveningstar.co.uk.

Rett syndrome

Rett syndrome is a complex neurological genetic disorder

It affects mainly girls, and only a very few boys.

Although present at birth, it becomes more evident during children's second years

People with Rett syndrome are profoundly and multiply disabled and highly dependent on others for their needs throughout their lives

Typically children with Rett syndrome begin by developing fairly normally but go through a period of losing acquired skills

At least one in every 10,000 girls born has Rett syndrome

Most Rett syndrome sufferers will not speak and by adulthood only 50per cent will walk

SOURCE: Rett Syndrome Association