Court told of frenzied knife attack

A PATHOLOGIST who carried out a post-mortem examination on a 21-year-old Suffolk man who was allegedly stabbed to death by his friend has described the attack as “frenzied”.

A PATHOLOGIST who carried out a post-mortem examination on a 21-year-old Suffolk man who was allegedly stabbed to death by his friend has described the attack as “frenzied”.

Dr David Rouse told a jury at Ipswich Crown Court that Prince Kofi Koomson suffered a total of 13 wounds, two of which could have each caused death on their own.

He said one of those wounds had penetrated Mr Koomson's heart while the other, which was 14 centimetres deep, had gone into his liver and severed a main artery.

He said that moderate-to-severe force would have been needed to cause the “significant wound” to Mr Koomson's liver and artery.

Dr Rouse said a stab wound to Mr Koomson's back near his right shoulder had penetrated the bone of his shoulder blade before entering one of his lungs. He said this wound which was seven centimetres deep would have required 'severe' force.

The pathologist said that other wounds had also been inflicted to Mr Koomson's thigh, buttock, hand and arm.

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Dr Rouse was giving evidence on the second day of the trial of 28-year-old Kwabena Asumadu who has denied murdering Mr Koomson on Christmas Eve last year.

The court has heard that Asumadu and Mr Koomson shared their rented house in St Johns Place, Bury St Edmunds with work colleague Daniel Frimpong and one of his friends Edward Kantanka had also been staying at the premises.

Graham Parkins QC, prosecuting, said that Asumadu, Mr Koomson and Mr Frimpong had all worked for a car valeting business in Bury St Edmunds and in the weeks before the alleged stabbing there appeared to have been growing resentment on the part of Asumadu towards Mr Koomson because he was earning less than him.

On the day before the alleged stabbing, Asumadu had gone out with Mr Kantanka and had moaned to him about the amount he earned and had added: “It's going to get bloody some day.'

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