Doctors rising to challenge

THIS team are no strangers to a challenge in the accident and emergency department, but the doctors and nurses are today gearing up for a different test.

THIS team are no strangers to a challenge in the accident and emergency department, but the doctors and nurses are today gearing up for a different test.

Staff from A&E at Ipswich Hospital are doing the Three Peaks Challenge in July - climbing Ben Nevis in Scotland, Scafell Pike in the Lake District and Mount Snowdon in Wales within 24 hours.

The group are raising money and awareness for the Motor Neurone Disease Association after a colleague underwent tests for a neurological illness.

Sister Ditta Keizer said: “We've been doing practise walks and people have been cycling into work instead of driving in to try and get fit.

“One of the hardest things for people is going without sleep, and we are confident we can deal with that as we do night shifts and work long hours.

“We will be raising money but it's more about raising awareness.

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“Motor neurone disease is incurable, and as nurses and doctors that's pretty hard for us to take - we want to be able to make people better.”

Staff nurse Steve Firth has climbed the three peaks before. He said: “Knowing my colleagues and their determination, there will be no problems completing it.”

Doing the challenge are sister Ditta Keizer, charge nurse Duane Elmy, sister Monica Ford, staff nurse Steve Firth, sister Sally Knight, staff nurse Paul Morris, consultant David Hodgkinson, staff nurse Faye Mulley, sister Katrina Wickens, staff nurse Becky Siles and consultant Peter Rushton, who used to work at Ipswich but is now at the Norfolk and Norwich Hospital.

Play specialist Suzanne Gregory and Ian Cheal, the husband of an A&E nurse, are driving the team between the peaks.

N To sponsor the team, visit www.justgiving.com/ipswichAE3peaks

Do you have a story like this you would like us to report on? Call the newsdesk on 01473 324788.

Motor neurone disease leaves people unable to walk, talk or feed themselves. It is fatal and there is no known cure. The average life expectancy after diagnosis is 14 months.

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