Drunk barged into stranger's home

A FORMER jockey who forced his way into a stranger's home and climbed into her bed is today behind bars.Harold Ballantine, who spent his career racing at Newmarket, appeared at South East Suffolk Magistrates Court on Monday charged with using violence to get inside a house, assault and assaulting a police officer.

A FORMER jockey who forced his way into a stranger's home and climbed into her bed is today behind bars.

Harold Ballantine, who spent his career racing at Newmarket, appeared at South East Suffolk Magistrates Court on Monday charged with using violence to get inside a house, assault and assaulting a police officer.

District judge David Cooper heard Ballantine, 50, arrived at a house in London Road, Ipswich at around 3am on November 5 wearing just a t-shirt, underpants and socks.

Prosecutor Sandra Dyer told the court Ballantine had woken the woman by banging on windows and making a noise outside the house. When she opened the door, he burst inside and went upstairs.

Ms Dyer said: "He pushed her into the house, he was shouting and headed straight for the stairs.

"He got into her bed against her will and she then called the police. He stayed up there making a lot of noise."

Most Read

When police arrived and tried to remove Ballantine from the bed they discovered he had removed his socks and underpants. He then kicked out and struck a policewoman.

The court also heard that after his first appearance before magistrates on November 6, he again returned to the same house and burst in, this time at 3.30am on November 19.

This time the woman living at the house grappled with Ballantine and he bit her on the back while she was calling police. When police arrived they found him lying on the sofa.

Judge Cooper heard Ballantine, whose address was given as a Salvation Army hostel in Fore Street, Ipswich, had a drink problem and had a record with 36 convictions, most of them drink related.

He pleaded guilty to all the offences and the court heard he had been remanded in custody since his last appearance.

Mitigating, Ian Duckworth told the court the time in custody had deeply affected Ballantine.

He said: "He accepts that if he is given a prison sentence today he would like a clean slate."

Sentencing Ballantine, Judge Cooper said his offences were so serious a custodial sentence was justified and sent him to prison for 28 days, but did not order compensation to be paid.

He said: "I don't imagine either the police or the victim want your money, they just want to never see you again."

Judge Cooper also made an attachment of earnings order for Ballantine's previous fines of more than £500.

Ballantine was also made the subject of a two-year Anti Social Behaviour Order which included banning him from entering any licensed premises in Suffolk, apart from The Beagle in Sproughton where he works, doing the washing up.

It also orders he must not be drunk and disorderly anywhere in England and Wales, not to drink in a public place anywhere in England and Wales, not to go his victim's home in London Road, not to contact the victim and not to cause harassment, alarm or distress to anyone in Suffolk or Essex.

Before Ballantine was led from the dock, Judge Cooper told him: "That's the order, I'll be amazed if you stick to it but best of luck."

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter