Family say goodbye to Annette

A BRIGHT and frosty morning saw the funeral of Annette Nicholls today. Miss Nicholls, 29, one of five women who was found dead in and around Ipswich during the red light killings was the first of the victims to be laid to rest.

A BRIGHT and frosty morning saw the funeral of Annette Nicholls today.

Miss Nicholls, 29, one of five women who was found dead in and around Ipswich during the red light killings was the first of the victims to be laid to rest.

A service for the 29-year-old mother of one was held at the Old Cemetery Church in Belvedere Road, Ipswich, with dozens of family and friends packing the aisles.

A group of about 20 journalists, mainly from local media, were held at the gates of the cemetery until the funeral cortège had arrived.


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About 9.45am the first members of the family arrived dressed in black and unwilling to look at the gathering press.

Then at about 10.20am the funeral procession arrived, a black Mercedes hearse carrying Miss Nicholls' body was taken through the gates inside the cemetery.

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The light brown coffin was dressed with pink, purple and white flowers with one bouquet in white and orange reading “friend”.

It was followed by two limousines carrying members of Miss Nicholls' family.

Police guarded the entrances to the cemetery preventing any uninvited people from gaining access.

Only family members were allowed to drive through to the church, others walking the short distance through the cemetery.

At about 10.30am the service got underway and snow began to fall. About 100 people were packed into the tiny church, 70 sitting and about 30 standing.

Those in attendance included several police officers. A small group of people remained outside.

The service, led by registrar Barbara Paternoster, lasted about 25 minutes, then the coffin was taken from the church in a hailstorm and placed back into the hearse to be taken to the Millennium Cemetery for a private burial.

The family gathered outside and embraced and shook hands before the cortege was led away.

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