Fun and profit on the heath

TEARS caused by a bump on the head from a flying golf ball could be cured by a silver coin in the hand, according to the childhood memories of adventures on Rushmere Heath in the 1930s.

The memories are from Tony Adams of Kesgrave, following the area being featured in a recent Kindred Spirits.

Tony said. “The Rushmere Heath of my boyhood, in the early 1930s, was a magic place for children with the variety of the seasons; the winter brought snow and out came the home made sledges for children to career down the slopes on.

“The brave would venture on to the tempting frozen surface of the valley pond, which was fortunately shallow, as the adventurous could end sliding and breaking through the ice and getting ‘wellies’ full of icy water.

“In the spring there were linnets nesting in the gorse and skylarks singing high in the sky.


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“Early summer brought the golden gorse, harebells and the purple heather.”

- To read the full Kindred Spirits column, buy Tuesday’s Evening Star or sign up for our e-edition by following the link at the right of this text.

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