Ghost-hunters flock to haunted fort

BUDDING ghost-hunters and paranormal detectives are being dared to see what goes bump in the night at what is claimed to be one of Britain's most haunted forts.

BUDDING ghost-hunters and paranormal detectives are being dared to see what goes bump in the night at what is claimed to be one of Britain's most haunted forts.

A team of spectre seekers recently had their “best ever” all-night session at Landguard Fort - with spooky goings on aplenty.

Several people witnessed blurred lights “like a bolt of lightning”, scraping at doors, and sounds from above one room where there was only a locked store cupboard.

Managers of the monument at Felixstowe are thrilled with its popularity for the events and have several more lined up for the next few months.


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On Saturday, September 12, Haunted Ghost Tours will be holding an event for people to sample the building's eerie atmosphere.

“There have been many paranormal sightings at the fort, the ghost of a soldier has been witnessed on many occasions as has the spirit of a sailor,” said Tricia Danson, events and marketing manager for North West Spirit Seekers, sister company to Haunted Ghost Tours.

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“Many people have run in terror after hearing unknown footsteps and the sounds of voices.

“The fort is certainly not for the faint hearted.”

The ghost hunt will run from 9pm until 3am. Tickets are at �59, available by calling 0800 9171067.

Have you seen a ghost at Landguard? Write to Your Letters, Evening Star, 30 Lower Brook Street, Ipswich, IP4 1AN, or e-mail eveningstarletters@eveningstar.co.uk

FASTFACTS: Spine-tingling Landguard

The ghost of the first ever soldier to be killed in action at the fort during the Second World War was witnessed immediately after his death, terrifying his fellow colleagues.

The image of a sailor has also been seen looking out of a window - even seen from the road outside.

A Musketeer who was said to be the only soldier killed in the battle when the Dutch attacked the fort in 1667 during the last invasion of England by a foreign force. He only seems to appear when the country is in danger.

The victim of an infectious plague who was locked in the bastion in 1770 and left to die a slow, horrible death.

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