Green recognition for golf club

ONGOING work to encourage wildlife and create new habitats along the coast at Felixstowe has been praised by judges of a national competition.Felixstowe Ferry Golf Club was given a highly commended award for its work on its links courses, which are part of a county wildlife site.

ONGOING work to encourage wildlife and create new habitats along the coast at Felixstowe has been praised by judges of a national competition.

Felixstowe Ferry Golf Club was given a highly commended award for its work on its links courses, which are part of a county wildlife site.

Peter Ling, a member of Suffolk Wildlife Trust who has been advising and working with the golf club on the habitat projects, said everyone involved was thrilled with the recognition.

“So much has been done at the club and so much more is planned - it's an excellent achievement both in improving an area for wildlife and making a more challenging golf course, creating a superb asset,” said Mr Ling.

“I have been working with the club for the past few years and they have been making a real effort.

“Some of the work has benefited the club in reducing maintenance costs, creating better holes and with extra areas of rough golfers have to be more accurate with their shots.

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“For the wildlife and plants it has been brilliant because it means these have been protected and increased. It's all very positive.”

Mr Ling said work which helped win the commendation from the British and International Golf Greenkeepers' Association included extra gorse planting the and the creation of mounds near the sea wall. There is more rough in the outplay areas with the vegetation providing homes and food for birds and butterflies.

The work on the two links courses next to the sea and River Deben has created a haven for hares and foxes as well as small mammals, including water voles, stoats, weasels, field mice, and shrews.

There is also habitat for three kinds of reptiles - grass snake, slow worms and common lizard - and an unusual mix of flowers close to the sea.

Bird life is naturally attracted to the food sources that include plants, seeds, insects and small mammals. There are also excellent nest sites in the reeds and the rough areas encourage reed warblers and sedge warblers near the water, and skylarks in the open areas.

What do you think of the work? Write to Your Letters, Evening Star, 30 Lower Brook Street, Ipswich, IP4 1AN, or e-mail EveningStarLetters@eveningstar.co.uk

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