Heartbroken widower tells of despair

NEARLY three years after a horrific crash which claimed the life of his wife and left him with life-changing injuries, Brian Seymour is today still waiting for compensation.

Naomi Cassidy

NEARLY three years after a horrific crash which claimed the life of his wife and left him with life-changing injuries, Brian Seymour is today still waiting for compensation.

The Ipswich grandfather has been left broken since the tragic events of August 18, 2005, but says his life is on hold until the compensation matter is tied up.

Heartbroken Mr Seymour, 69, still finds it hard to talk about the day when his wife, Christine, 58, was taken away from him, and he lost both his legs after a speeding motorcyclist crashed into them and their young grandchildren, Kieran and Ethan, as they were crossing London Road, Ipswich.


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Mr Seymour said: “It will be three years on August 18 since we had the accident and it is ridiculous the compensation hasn't come through.

“I probably wouldn't be alive long enough to spend it but it can go to my sons and help them. They lost their mother.

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“It has really changed my life. Me and my wife used to go everywhere together but I have only got myself now. I never go near the site of the accident. If I want to go into town, I go all through the back roads so I avoid it.”

Mr Seymour has already received £40,000 compensation, which enabled him to buy a specially adapted car for his disability and run it for a year, yet there has been a delay in processing a claim for further money.

A legal battle has now commenced though it could be a year before anything is resolved.

His son, Shaun Seymour, said: “Dad gets very stressed about it all. It would be nice if he got the money so he could go off on holiday or do something for himself.”

Steven Webb, the Seymour's solicitor at Colchester-based Thompson, Smith and Puxon said the dispute did not surround whether further compensation would be granted, rather the level of compensation.

He said: “Proceedings are about to be launched to assess the levels of compensation.”

Christopher Bainbridge, of Lincoln Close, Ipswich, was sentenced to three-and-a-half years in prison after being found guilty of causing death by dangerous driving, but served half that and was released in January.

His recent court application to have his drivers' licence back early was refused. The accident also left Kieran with serious leg injuries, for which he is still receiving physiotherapy.

Brian Seymour added: “I was so angry when he [Bainbridge] went back to court to get his licence back. As far as I'm concerned he shouldn't be out of prison. I've always said it should be life for a life.”

Solicitors acting on behalf of Bainbridge's insurance company, were unavailable for comment.

Have you been in an accident that has changed your Write to Your Letters, Evening Star, 30 Lower Brook Street, Ipswich, IP4 1AN, or e-mail eveningstarletters@eveningstar.co.uk

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