Hope for the future for Glynis

IT HAS been a torrid year for teenager Glynis Day and her family after losing her baby Luke at just 36 hours old.But today the 18-year-old is looking to a brighter future and is nearly four months pregnant with her second child.

IT HAS been a torrid year for teenager Glynis Day and her family after losing her baby Luke at just 36 hours old.

But today the 18-year-old is looking to a brighter future and is nearly four months pregnant with her second child.

And she hopes her determination to have the baby at Ipswich Hospital will give other mums-to-be hope.

Baby Luke, who died at Ipswich Hospital in February, was thought to be Britain's youngest MRSA fatality.

His family was thrust into the national spotlight as they demanded answers into how this could have happened.

But a report released yesterday has cast doubt over the cause of his death.

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Struggling to hold back the tears, brave Glynis said: "It's not replacing Luke, but it's a new, fresh start."

Glynis and the baby's father, who is not Luke's father Kevin Fenton, are looking forward to the baby's birth in January.

Glynis, of Woodbridge, said: "It gives me something to hope for. I have all the clothes and the cot, although everything is dinosaurs."

Her twin sister, Lizzie Day, added: "So if it's a girl, it will have to be a tomboy!"

Glynis continued: "I don't know if it's a boy or a girl, but I am going to find out at 20 weeks.

"I thought about the name Jake for a boy or Caitlin for a girl.

"I will be having the baby at Ipswich Hospital. I do trust them now, after all the changes that have been made – I have already been back for my antenatal care.

"I am obviously a bit worried, but I am confident that the changes made will be for the best, not just for me but for everyone.

"It's just bad that it took Luke's death for the changes to be made."

Lizzie, also 18 and of Woodbridge, added: "I am looking forward to having a playmate for my nine-month-old daughter Lucy.

"I am helping Glynis and we are both looking forward to it. I am going to keep a watch to make sure nothing goes wrong."

n. What do you think of Glynis's story? Write to Your Letters, Evening Star, 30 Lower Brook Street, Ipswich, IP4 1AN or email eveningstarletters@eveningstar.co.uk

N MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureas) is a type of bacterium less easily treated with common antibiotics.

N It usually lives harmlessly in the nose, throat and on parts of the skin.

N It is thought that up to 50 per cent of the population carry the common bacterium.

N People can have it on their skin without it causing serious problems, while others can get more serious infections with it.

N It can be spread via touch and from the environment – and so good standards of cleanliness are necessary.

N MRSA can be treated with the newest antibiotics but, over time, becomes resistant to most common antibiotics

N Patients most at risk include the very young and old, cancer sufferers and those with intravenous lines or wounds.

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