How did Ipswich cope as its population multiplied in the 1920s and 30s? David Kindred takes a look

An aerial view of the area of Ipswich between Felixstowe Road and Nacton Road taken in the 1970s. Pr

An aerial view of the area of Ipswich between Felixstowe Road and Nacton Road taken in the 1970s. Priory Heath Schools/Holywells High School and its playing field are across the centre. In the foreground are Lindbergh Road, Hilton Road and Campbell Road, Cody Road and Halton Crescent. Photo by Jim Empson.

Photographer David Kindred has been looking back at the development of Ipswich, and how whole council estates were created to house the growing population.


The Nacton Road area was hit during the Second World War bombing raids. Raiders were no doubt aimin

The Nacton Road area was hit during the Second World War bombing raids. Raiders were no doubt aiming for Cranes Ltd engineering works and the airport. One of the most tragic events in Ipswich during the war was late in the evening of August 2 ,1942, when a bomb hit an Anderson shelter in the garden of 501 Nacton Road and the corner of Lindbergh Road. Mrs Kate Nunn and her eight children were killed. The children were Alice (18), Charles (14), Doreen (5), Ernest (16), Herbert (8) Jean (eight months) Kenneth (4) and Raymond (10). Husband and father Ernest was nearby and was badly injured by the blast. The same bomb killed three others in adjoining houses. ARP man William Schulen (53), Fire watcher Alfred Southgate (48) and William Thomas (42). One bomb killed twelve people and injured two others.Three other bombs, dropped at the same time, did not explode. One landed on the Murray Road recreation ground. Do you know more about this tragedy?

Here he tells us more.

Ipswich’s population had grown. In 1841 it was 25,264, it had more than doubled to 57,081 by 1891, and by 1932 it was almost 90,000.

To provide housing to replace slums in the town centre the town expanded with new council housing in the 1920 and 30s, including along the Nacton Road, when housing was built between Felixstowe Road and Nacton Road.Much of the site had been a horse racing course between 1710 and 1911 and part of the area became known as “Racecourse”.

The town’s trolley bus service was extended to the new airport, which was officially opened by the Prince of Wales in June 1930, where Ravenswood is now.

In this edition of Kindred Spirits I have found photographs of the area, some happy, some very sad.

A German V1 ÒDoodlebugÓ bomb landed in Halton Crescent October 18, 1944, damaging ten houses and ki

A German V1 ÒDoodlebugÓ bomb landed in Halton Crescent October 18, 1944, damaging ten houses and killing five people. Do you know more about this awful day over seventy years ago?

Do you recognise any of these photos? Share your memories by emailing info@kindred-spirit.co.uk

See more photographic memories from David Kindred here