How I miss my Jason - fiancee's grief

SHE misses him so much.Charlotte Ingham had her life with her 30-year-old fiancé Jason Godfrey all planned out.They were to be married and start a family, but just as the inseparable couple started to get their lives back on track after Jason's ten year battle with cancer he was cruelly snatched from her, leaving her alone.

SHE misses him so much.

Charlotte Ingham had her life with her 30-year-old fiancé Jason Godfrey all planned out.

They were to be married and start a family, but just as the inseparable couple started to get their lives back on track after Jason's ten year battle with cancer he was cruelly snatched from her, leaving her alone.

The DIY work he was doing on the stair rail in their house in Stour Avenue, Felixstowe, still remains unfinished and plans to redecorate their home are just plans they once shared.

Charlotte, 29, said: "I will miss not having him around, being there and chatting and having somebody there.

"We didn't go on extravagant holidays, we were quite happy with that as long as we were together, we were happy, we rarely had a day apart we were literally inseparable.

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"I will miss everything about him, he was really kind and generous and he wouldn't think twice about helping anybody else even though he couldn't do normal stuff all the time."

For the first time in years Jason had felt well. He had been given the all clear from the cancer he had fought twice from the age of 20, and had just had a hip replacement enabling him to walk again.

But Charlotte's dreams of a bright new future were shattered when a blood clot in his heart killed him.

"His heart stopped three times, all the vital organs failed as well and I think he couldn't fight anymore. It was just all so quick. In some ways it is a nice thing - he didn't feel anything, but it really didn't deserve to be him."

His mum Rita said: "We all miss him a lot we thought we were going to have him for a long while. It was such a shock to go so quickly.

"He was a very happy-go-lucky chap all the time. He was very quiet until you got to know him but then he could have a really strange sense of humour, he used to have a giggle."

Jason had to endure chemotherapy and an operation to remove a tumour when he was 20 but Charlotte, who had been engaged to him for six years, said he was rarely grumpy.

"We hardly ever argued and got on really well but he rarely was grumpy as such, we all have bad days, but he didn't take it out on anybody else."

Jason, who was a devoted Arsenal FC fan and a collector of model cars, never complained about his numerous illnesses which often debilitated him, instead it made him appreciate the simple things in life.

"He hated sitting around, he wanted to be back working," Charlotte said. "He enjoyed shopping for clothes in Ipswich. He appreciated things we don't appreciate because we have the chance to do it."

Jason, who worked as a fork lift driver at the Port of Felixstowe, first got cancer when he was 20. He spent his 21st birthday in hospital after the tumour attached to his spine was surgically removed and as he was temporarily paralysed from the waist down he had to learn how to walk again.

But in 1997 Jason found he had cancer again, but this time he was told that it would have to be treated with chemotherapy and doctors warned him he had a one in 20 chance of surviving.

The son of John and brother of Mark and Tracey made a full recovery but in 2000 doctors discovered his hip joints were crumbling. The problem became so severe that Jason could hardly walk and so he had a hip replacement in June this year and was enjoying his new found mobility again until he began to experience breathing difficulties. He started wheezing and his breathlessness kept him confined indoors.

He was admitted to hospital after his condition became more serious and a scan showed he had a blood clot in his heart. He died a week later on October 13.

Mrs Godfrey said she wanted to thank all of Jason's friends and family who went to his funeral at Ipswich Crematorium last Thursday .

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