It's a sign

A MISSING mural – which celebrates a village's most famous son – is back in place after being restored to its former glory.The historic painting which adorns the outside of the Three Mariners at Trimley St Mary was taken down as part of a project to refurbish the outside of the pub.

A MISSING mural – which celebrates a village's most famous son – is back in place after being restored to its former glory.

The historic painting which adorns the outside of the Three Mariners at Trimley St Mary was taken down as part of a project to refurbish the outside of the pub.

The mural, which depicts a seafaring scene in honour of Thomas Cavendish's trip to circumnavigate the world, was taken down around two months ago.

It was sent off to an artist specialising in restoration as its paint was very dry and chalky and had started to crumble. Now it is looking a picture once more.

Landlady Linda Green, who runs the pub in High Road with joint licensee Sharon White, said the pub is a Grade II listed building and the mural was one of its most important features.

They were delighted to have it back and people had missed it, although they had assured them it would return.

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"It had to be taken down because we were refurbishing the pub and as a part of the pub it needed some work done, too," said Linda.

"We are very pleased with how it has all turned out – the pub had been looking awful and a bit run down and wishy washy. Now people are noticing it more and the minute it was finished takings went up."

Tradition has it that the pub was named the Three Mariners to celebrate pirate and explorer Thomas Cavendish's exploits and international reputation.

In 1588, at the age of 28, Cavendish became only the second ever Englishman to lead a round the world expedition.

After mortgaging all of his lands for £10,000, he fitted out three ships – the Desire, the Content and the Hugh Gallant – to carry his 123 adventurers, hence the name of the pub, and make discoveries for his country.

Cavendish, who was baptised in Trimley St Martin Church on September 19, 1560, was the only person from Trimley ever to be mentioned in the National Dictionary of Biography.

Cavendish, who lived at Grimston Hall and was educated at Cambridge and then took legal training in London, was given a great feast in his honour in Trimley after his round the world expedition, but his crew got out of hand and tore through the village terrifying the people out of their wits.

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