'Tin Can Alley!' Kesgrave litter pickers clear streets of over 300 bottles

Jason Alexander supported Anne-Marie Davies, who has started the Kesgrave Wombles litter-picking group

Jason Alexander supported Anne-Marie Davies, who has started the Kesgrave Wombles litter-picking group - Credit: Jason Alexander

Kesgrave litter pickers nicknamed a road "Tin Can Alley" after unearthing more than 300 bottles on one street - including 43 cans of Fosters lager.

Anne-Marie Davies has set up the Kesgrave Wombles to help clean up the community.

A total of 11 volunteers and Rubbish Walks founder Jason Alexander helped her clear away 10 glass bottles, 62 plastic bottles and 260 cans - all of which had been tossed into hedgerows in Dobbs Lane.

The Kesgrave Wombles held their first litter pick on Saturday, March 20

The Kesgrave Wombles held their first litter pick on Saturday, March 20 - Credit: Jason Alexander

Mr Alexander said after the Covid-secure litter-pick: "By the time we had finished we thought we should rename it ‘Tin Can Alley’ as there were so many drinks cans thrown onto the verges and in hedgerows.

"The other disappointing find was an abundance of dog poo bags just thrown in hedgerows or left by pathways."


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He added that the amount of rubbish thrown into hedgerows was "unbelievable".

More than 300 bottles and cans were found on the Kesgrave Wombles litter pick

More than 300 bottles and cans were found on the Kesgrave Wombles litter pick - Credit: Jason Alexander

However, he said it was "heartwarming" to see the response to the Kesgrave Wombles group, which already has nearly 150 followers on Facebook.

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"One of the key things I'm trying to do with the Wombles is not create one group, but help pockets of people living in neighbourhoods set up their own groups," he said.

"That way, we can all cover a wider area."

He said key message was to stop people littering in the first place - but, if people do see rubbish on the ground, to pick it up and help keep their communities clean and tidy.

"It's very much about trying to work together," he said.

"We all live together. The only way that we're going to keep on top of it is to work together."

Mr Alexander recently showed off his "litter museum" of old finds from his rubbish collections.

It includes wrappers of sweets and chocolate bars which have long since disappeared from the shelves, along with crisp packets which are more than 50 years old.

While the items offer an amusing trip down memory lane, Mr Alexander said they also show the long-term damage plastic litter can cause - as it can stay and pollute the environment for decades.

For more information on the Kesgrave Wombles, join its Facebook group.

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