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Days Gone By: Journey through time in the history of St Margaret’s Plain and beyond

PUBLISHED: 15:17 17 April 2018 | UPDATED: 08:20 19 April 2018

Ipswich Dock in the mid 1930s. This photograph was taken from what was then known as Flint Wharf, looking towards Albion Wharf. The only building remaining now is on the right. Picture: WILLIAM LOVELL

Ipswich Dock in the mid 1930s. This photograph was taken from what was then known as Flint Wharf, looking towards Albion Wharf. The only building remaining now is on the right. Picture: WILLIAM LOVELL

Dave Kindred

William Lovell was the chief librarian with the East Anglian Daily Times Company for several decades.

The Lloyds Avenue arch looking towards the Cornhill. The arch was cut through the Victorian building with work starting in 1929. The first traffic to use the new route was in January 1930. Picture: WILLIAM LOVELL
The Lloyds Avenue arch looking towards the Cornhill. The arch was cut through the Victorian building with work starting in 1929. The first traffic to use the new route was in January 1930. Picture: WILLIAM LOVELL

He was a keen amateur photographer and many of his photographs were published in the companies newspapers and the East Anglian Magazine.

In this week’s Days Gone By I have featured some of his photographs of Ipswich. Many of the scenes are instantly recognisable, others feature buildings now altered or demolished.

An arch was cut through this house at the junction of Elm Street (left) Lion Street (right) and King Street in 1850, to create Arcade Street as a link with Museum Street. The building was occupied by Thomas Moy coal merchant at a time when most homes, shops, schools and offices were heated by coal. Picture: WILLIAM LOVELL
An arch was cut through this house at the junction of Elm Street (left) Lion Street (right) and King Street in 1850, to create Arcade Street as a link with Museum Street. The building was occupied by Thomas Moy coal merchant at a time when most homes, shops, schools and offices were heated by coal. Picture: WILLIAM LOVELL

Also featured are readers memories prompted by earlier Days Gone By features on Anglesea Road Hospital and the Suffolk College.

Sue Garwood emailed in her memories of The Anglesea Road, Ipswich Hospital: “I did my nurses training there 1969-72. I wore the lilac dress with starched hat, collar and apron and had a scarlet-lined, navy cape worn when walking from Norton House to duty in the hospital. Happy days, looking like ancient history now. I did placements on every ward there over my three years, as we all did in those days.”

St Margaret's Green and church in the 1930s. The Saracens Head public house on the left, at the corner of Soane Street, closed in November 1960. The building is now a business centre. Picture: WILLIAM LOVELLSt Margaret's Green and church in the 1930s. The Saracens Head public house on the left, at the corner of Soane Street, closed in November 1960. The building is now a business centre. Picture: WILLIAM LOVELL

The Suffolk College featured in a recent Days Gone By, Michael Revell sent this in: The area around Rope Walk where it was built was cleared of poor housing and businesses in the 1930s and the college, then called the Civic College, was opened by the Queen in 1961.

I can remember that area in the 50s as it looked in one of the pictures, and seeing the college (which I eventually attended) being built later on whilst riding in my father’s lorry.

The building at the junction of Soane Street (left) and St Margaret's Street was altered in the early 1930s to widen the road. Two gables facing St Margaret's Plain were removed and three new gables built facing St Margaret's Street. Picture: WILLIAM LOVELLThe building at the junction of Soane Street (left) and St Margaret's Street was altered in the early 1930s to widen the road. Two gables facing St Margaret's Plain were removed and three new gables built facing St Margaret's Street. Picture: WILLIAM LOVELL

For a time during the 1930s my father worked for Ipswich Borough Council and worked on demolishing the properties and clearing that area. His abiding memories of that job were that it seemed every other building was a pub and many rats. There were thousands of them, people brought dogs to tackle the rats, but they overwhelmed the dogs, which didn’t know way to turn.

Although my father worked for the council, he did not live in Ipswich, he lived in Cratfield.

These buildings on St Margaret's Plain were built in the 1930s in Tudor style. They replaced a row of small shops and houses dating back centuries. The space on the left became the Ewers Grey Green Coach station and is now used as a car wash. Picture: WILLIAM LOVELLThese buildings on St Margaret's Plain were built in the 1930s in Tudor style. They replaced a row of small shops and houses dating back centuries. The space on the left became the Ewers Grey Green Coach station and is now used as a car wash. Picture: WILLIAM LOVELL

Every Monday morning he left home early and cycled nearly 40 miles to start work in Ipswich at seven o’clock, he lodged in Ipswich Monday through to Thursday and then on Friday evening, after finishing work, he cycled home. Different days!

Do you have memories you would like to share with readers? To submit a letter, in less than 300 words, write to David Kindred, Days Gone By, Ipswich Star/EADT, Portman House, 120 Princes Street, Ipswich, IP1 1RS or e-mail info@kindred-spirit.co.uk

St Margaret's Green in the 1930s, looking towards the junction with St Margaret's Street. All of the buildings featured remain today. The Old Manor House on the left was the Ipswich home of the Cobbold family, where Margaret Catchpole first went into service as a cook. She moved with the family to Cliff House at the family brewery, from where she stole a horse and was sentenced to death at Bury St Edmunds Assizes in 1797. Margarets sentence was commuted to transportation for life. She escaped from the Ipswich Gaol and was sentenced to death a second time. She was saved by the intervention of Mrs Cobbold and transported to Australia.
The Old Manor House is now converted to offices. Picture: WILLIAM LOVELLSt Margaret's Green in the 1930s, looking towards the junction with St Margaret's Street. All of the buildings featured remain today. The Old Manor House on the left was the Ipswich home of the Cobbold family, where Margaret Catchpole first went into service as a cook. She moved with the family to Cliff House at the family brewery, from where she stole a horse and was sentenced to death at Bury St Edmunds Assizes in 1797. Margarets sentence was commuted to transportation for life. She escaped from the Ipswich Gaol and was sentenced to death a second time. She was saved by the intervention of Mrs Cobbold and transported to Australia. The Old Manor House is now converted to offices. Picture: WILLIAM LOVELL

Grimwade Street, Ipswich, from near the junction with Fore Street, in the 1930s. This is one of Ipswich’s busiest roads now. The iron railings have gone from the front of the buildings and the last house in the row, at the corner of New Street, has been replaced with student accommodation. Picture: WILLIAM LOVELL 

Grimwade Street, Ipswich, from near the junction with Fore Street, in the 1930s. This is one of Ipswich’s busiest roads now. The iron railings have gone from the front of the buildings and the last house in the row, at the corner of New Street, has been replaced with student accommodation. Picture: WILLIAM LOVELL

Fore Street, Ipswich. When this photograph was taken in the 1930s the sixteenth century building had shop windows cut into the front wall. These have since been removed. Picture: WILLIAM LOVELL 
Fore Street, Ipswich. When this photograph was taken in the 1930s the sixteenth century building had shop windows cut into the front wall. These have since been removed. Picture: WILLIAM LOVELL


Fore Street, Ipswich, at the junction with Salthouse Street (left), around 1935. The premises of J Hoyle and Co on the left was demolished when the entrance to Salthouse Street was widened.  Picture: WILLIAM LOVELL
Fore Street, Ipswich, at the junction with Salthouse Street (left), around 1935. The premises of J Hoyle and Co on the left was demolished when the entrance to Salthouse Street was widened. Picture: WILLIAM LOVELL

The tower of St Clements Church, Ipswich, is in the background of this view of St Clements Church Lane. The corner of Fore Street Baths is on the right. All of the buildings on the left have been demolished, including the former Angel Inn on the extreme left, which was a cafe when this picture was taken. Picture: WILLIAM LOVELLThe tower of St Clements Church, Ipswich, is in the background of this view of St Clements Church Lane. The corner of Fore Street Baths is on the right. All of the buildings on the left have been demolished, including the former Angel Inn on the extreme left, which was a cafe when this picture was taken. Picture: WILLIAM LOVELL

Angel lane, Ipswich, looking towards Fore Street. The building on the right was formerly the Lion and Lamb public house, which closed in 1908. Picture: WILLIAM LOVELLAngel lane, Ipswich, looking towards Fore Street. The building on the right was formerly the Lion and Lamb public house, which closed in 1908. Picture: WILLIAM LOVELL

The Old Neptune Inn, Fore Street, Ipswich, is a part fifteenth and part sixteenth century merchants house. It is thought to have become an inn during the eighteenth century and was an inn or beerhouse until 1937. It is now a holiday let. Picture: WILLIAM LOVELLThe Old Neptune Inn, Fore Street, Ipswich, is a part fifteenth and part sixteenth century merchants house. It is thought to have become an inn during the eighteenth century and was an inn or beerhouse until 1937. It is now a holiday let. Picture: WILLIAM LOVELL


William Lovell at work in the East Anglian Daily Times and Evening Star library at the Carr Street offices in the 1950s. Picture: ARCHANT
William Lovell at work in the East Anglian Daily Times and Evening Star library at the Carr Street offices in the 1950s. Picture: ARCHANT

Rope Walk, Ipswich, in the early 1930s. The public house on the right, the Fruiterers Home Inn, at the corner of Borough Road, closed in December 1937. Picture: DAVID KINDRED ARCHIVE Rope Walk, Ipswich, in the early 1930s. The public house on the right, the Fruiterers Home Inn, at the corner of Borough Road, closed in December 1937. Picture: DAVID KINDRED ARCHIVE


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