New communities need careful thought

FOR five years villagers of the historic twin Trimley communities have been dogged with worry over their future - with the threat of massive development looming large.

FOR five years villagers of the historic twin Trimley communities have been dogged with worry over their future - with the threat of massive development looming large.

Trinity College, Cambridge, sparked the controversy with its self-started and controversial plans for a comprehensive redevelopment of the area which would have ruined the villages' rural character and turned them into full-blown suburbs, larger than many of the county's smaller towns.Now that the fog is starting to clear from the issue, Suffolk Coastal has at long last put forward some possible sites for new homes.

While many will be concerned at the suggestion of crossing the A14 into the countryside, today we applaud the council for standing up to Trinity College and not taking the easy option of simply adopting its glossy and neatly presented proposals.

If it is decided to build across the dual carriageway, this could be the least worst option.

It would certainly safeguard Trimley St Mary and Trimley St Martin and their fields and lanes, precious to all who live there and choose to do so because of their rural nature.

Clearly full protection needs to be extended to any community threatened by a major development.

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There is still a long way to go - and a public inquiry may have to be held before anything is finally decided - and as yet Suffolk Coastal has put forward no plans for the extra schools, shops and community facilities which might be needed.

Today, though, villagers can have greater confidence that their views are being listened to.

MARCUS Evans has now been to see his new team playing live for the first time since his takeover of Ipswich Town was confirmed last month.

And he must have enjoyed watching the Superblues overcome table-topping West Bromwich Albion on New Year's Day.

Of course Mr Evans knew he was buying a club which is good at home and dreadful on its travels, but his visit must have given him a new understanding of the passion displayed by the club's thousands of supporters.

Since his visit, of course, the team's home form has dipped slightly - suffering an unfortunate defeat against Portsmouth in the Cup and only managing a scrappy draw against Stoke.

Hopefully now Mr Evans knows what is needed to convert the team from one challenging for a play-off spot into one able to claim an automatic promotion place.

And like the rest of the fans he will be looking forward to seeing who is brought in by Jim Magilton over the next couple of weeks.

AS THE eyes of the world once again turn to Ipswich with the start of the Steve Wright trial, it is inevitable that unpleasant memories will be stirred up.

However the organisation of the trial appears to have received a great deal of thought to make the process as businesslike as possible.

And while Ipswich might be under the spotlight for very sad reasons, those who call the area home should not forget this is a good place to live with good people and a strong community heart.