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Decision reached over 300 homes in Bell Lane, Kesgrave - see the outcome here

PUBLISHED: 16:14 22 July 2018 | UPDATED: 16:14 22 July 2018

The land at Bell Lane, Kesgrave, which has been the subject of wrangling for 300 homes for the past two years Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN

The land at Bell Lane, Kesgrave, which has been the subject of wrangling for 300 homes for the past two years Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN

Archant

An appeal to build 300 homes in Kesgrave has been dismissed by the Planning Inspectorate – more than two years after the original decision was made.

Debbie McCallum said it was the right decision for Kesgrave Picture: Colin ShawDebbie McCallum said it was the right decision for Kesgrave Picture: Colin Shaw

In June 2016 Suffolk Coastal District Council’s planning committee refused plans by Persimmon and BTP to develop land in Bell Lane.

The developers launched an appeal, which went to a planning inquiry last year and was dismissed.

But a second planning inquiry had to be held last month after the developers issued a legal challenge to the way the original inquiry reached a decision – a decision the High Court upheld.

On Friday, planning inspector John Murray issued a decision to dismiss the appeal, meaning the plans have been refused.

Suffolk Coastal district councillor for Kesgrave Debbie McCallum said: “It’s a great decision for Kesgrave.

“People have had to wait a long while for the conclusion of this.

“Although the inspector doesn’t agree with some of the things we say he has reinforced our policies.

“He talks about our development plan and we do have a healthy supply of housing.

“We are going to have housing at Adastral Park and this would have made a huge impact on Bell Lane in particular.

“Although the inspector doesn’t take much note of that, our residents will feel a lot better about that knowing the outcome of this.”

The inquiry focused on whether the scheme married to Suffolk Coastal’s development plan, whether there was adequate access for cyclists and public transport, whether there was a five year land supply and if there were alternatives.

Mr Murray ruled that it did not meet the development plan, and although it would have been integrated with the rest of the town it was on land considered countryside.

His report acknowledged the district had a housing supply of seven years and said that the “other material considerations identified are insufficient to indicate that the appeal should be determined otherwise than in accordance with the development plan”.

The recent draft local plan only earmarked a further 20 homes for Kesgrave over the 20 year period.

The developers and Kesgrave Town Council have been approached for comment.


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