Police hunt thug who shot cat

A HORRIFIED cat owner today levelled an angry blast at the “cowards” responsible for shooting a pellet into the spine of her pet.As a result of his injuries, Karen Field's 15-month-old cat Harley will never be able to walk properly again and he can no longer leave the house.

A HORRIFIED cat owner today levelled an angry blast at the “cowards” responsible for shooting a pellet into the spine of her pet.

As a result of his injuries, Karen Field's 15-month-old cat Harley will never be able to walk properly again and he can no longer leave the house.

The savagery of the attack was such that only an emergency two-hour operation to remove the 5mm pellet, costing up to £300, saved Harley's life.

Mrs Field, of Boyton Road, Gainsborough, said: “When he came in he was not walking properly and there was blood coming from his neck. I screamed and grabbed him and ran out of the door, heading to the vets.

“I thought he had been hit by a car but the vet took an X-ray and told me it was a pellet wedged against his spine. The vet said had the pellet been any higher or lower, he would have died.

“The people who did this are cowards. If they think it's fun to take pot shots at animals they are total cowards. If they want to fire those things, they should shoot tin cans.”

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Mrs Field, 37, said Harley's operation had been a partial success but he has been left with slight paralysis on his right hand side.

But she heaped praise on the staff at Barn Veterinary Surgery in Copdock who saved his life.

The incident has been reported to police who are due to collect the pellet before continuing their investigations.

It is the latest in a line of sickening attacks on cats in Suffolk.

In March, the RSPCA branded the thug who snared a cat by setting up a gin trap in Rushmere as “barbaric”. Another gin trap in Kesgrave a month later maimed a cat.

In April, police made an appeal after two cats were shot with air rifles in Beccles, in the north of the county, and in January a family cat in Kessingland was found strangled with a child's skipping rope.

With Harley beginning his recovery at home, Mrs Field said the ordeal had left its mark.

She continued: “He is very quiet and not like he used to be. He is scared. If he hears a noise outside, his ears prick up. He'll never be able to go outside again.

“The vet thinks it could take up to six months to see any improvement, but the main thing is he's still here.”

Those found guilty of causing unnecessary suffering to an animal could face a maximum sentence of up to six months in prison and a £5,000 fine.

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