Refugees cannot be turned away

ALL too often refugees are seen as a problem for the country that offers them shelter.But reading the heartbreaking story of Izaac Darbous and his family, it soon becomes clear that any problems we face in helping out families like this are nothing compared with the problems they have faced in trying to find a place of safety.

ALL too often refugees are seen as a problem for the country that offers them shelter.

But reading the heartbreaking story of Izaac Darbous and his family, it soon becomes clear that any problems we face in helping out families like this are nothing compared with the problems they have faced in trying to find a place of safety.

Whatever difficulties we have in Britain are a minor irritant for us compared with the genocide and inhuman treatment that is going on in Sudan.

Of course there will be those who say those problems are in a far away part of the world of which we know very little - but to do that would be to pass on the other side of the road.


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Not everyone who applies for refugee status comes from an area where civil war is rife. There are many who try to use refugee status as a cover for trying to make a better life for themselves.

Those people clearly need to be treated differently when they try to stay in this country.

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But for people like Izaac and his family there will always be a need for a safe haven. And this country cannot turn its back on them.

After all Britain was quite happy to bring Sudan under its jurisdiction during the 19th century - and was prepared to go to war with the local warlords even then establish the country as an entity on the continent of Africa.

Those who say we should worry about giving people from Sudan sanctuary in the 21st century should learn about General Gordon's campaigns in the country 130 years ago.

SARAH and Colin Wright have been through the kind of ordeal all parents dread - their new-born baby Samuel died aged less than a month after being moved between hospitals in Ipswich and Norwich.

Of course they want full answers about why this tragedy happened and nothing that is said or done by managers at Ipswich Hospital can ever bring Samuel back to them.

But they have been left dissatisfied with the results of Ipswich Hospital's inquiry and are now left feeling that their concerns were not adequately addressed.

There is clearly more to be done by the hospital authorities if the family's faith in its management is to be restored.

AS Jeremy and Lorraine Barber start their married life together, everyone at The Evening Star would like to wish them all the best as we take pride in bringing them together in the first place.

At the hectic pace of life today, it is often difficult to find time to meet the person that you want to share the rest of your life with.

There are many different ways of getting together, and we are delighted that Jeremy and Lorraine found such happiness after meeting through the pages of the Star.

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