School decides to ban the bun

A TRADITIONAL Easter bun has caused one school to get a bit hot - but not cross - where political correctness is concerned.For fear of offending the religious minorities at The Oaks Primary School in Ipswich, headteacher Tina Jackson has asked suppliers to remove the cross from their hot cross buns.

A TRADITIONAL Easter bun has caused one school to get a bit hot - but not cross - where political correctness is concerned.

For fear of offending the religious minorities at The Oaks Primary School in Ipswich, headteacher Tina Jackson has asked suppliers to remove the cross from their hot cross buns.

But Father Haley Dossor, vicar at St Mary-at-the-Elms in Ipswich's Elm Street, said he feels it is political correctness gone a bit too far.

He said: “All religions have particular traditions, habits and customs and this is one of the traditions of the Church of England.


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“I would be surprised if anyone was offended. It seems to me people in the secular world are scared of religious symbols. The school is quite wrong. All religions should respect each other.”

However Miss Jackson from the Aster Road school defended the decision to turn the hot cross bun into a simple currant bun.

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She said: “The buns were served as pudding on Tuesday we could have had iced buns or hot cross buns.

“Obviously the hot cross bun is a celebration of Easter but it is not Easter yet.

“The cross is there in recognition of the crucifixion and resurrection of Christ but for our students who are Jehovah Witnesses hot cross buns are not part of their beliefs.

“We decided to ask to have the cross removed in respect of their beliefs. It was just a currant bun.”

One concerned observer, who did not wish to be named, said: “I have never heard of anything so ridiculous. Since when have hot cross buns been offensive?”

Albert Berwick, a minister with the Ipswich Cavendish Congregation of Jehovah's Witnesses, said the buns would indeed be offensive to members.

He said: “I can understand why the school has done this and I support the decision. Hot cross buns are a pagan symbol of fertility no different to bunnies, eggs and Easter.

“They are representative of the Christian faith. The bible states we should not worship things of a pagan origin.”

A spokeswoman for the Local education Authority - Suffolk County Council - said: “We have not issued any guidelines on hot cross buns. It is not something the LEA would get involved in.”

Do you think hot cross buns should be banned from schools? What do you think? Write to Your Letters, Evening Star, 30 Lower Brook Street, Ipswich, IP4 1AN or send us an e-mail to eveningstarletters@eveningstar.co.uk

Hot-cross buns! Hot-cross buns!

One a penny, two a penny,

Hot-cross buns!

If you have no daughters,

Give them to your sons,

One a penny, two a penny,

Hot-cross buns!

But if you have none of these little elves,

Then you may eat them all yourselves.

Hot Cross Bun Fast Facts

Hot Cross Buns are small, sweet yeast buns with raisins or candied fruit, marked on top with a cross of white glaze.

They are traditionally served on Good Friday.

According to some the tradition dates back to the 16th or 17th century though others believe the origins of the Hot Cross Bun date back even further.

In 1361, a monk named Father Thomas Rocliffe, was recorded to have made small spiced cakes stamped with the sign of the cross, to be distributed to the poor visiting the monastery at St. Albans on Good Friday.

Hot Cross buns are traditionally eaten during lent.

To the ancient Aztecs and Incas, buns were considered the sacred food of the gods, while the Egyptians and Saxons offered them as sacrifices to their goddesses.

The cross represented the four quarters of the moon to certain ancient cultures, while others believed it was a sign that held supernatural power to prevent sickness.

To the Romans, the cross represented the horns of a sacred ox.

In 2002 the Food Standards Agency said “Hot cross buns, with their fruit and fibre content, are definitely the all round healthy choice for consumers wanting to indulge a little this Easter.”

Source www.erasofelegance.com

TRADITIONAL HOT CROSS BUNS RECIPE

3/4 cup warm water (110 degrees F/45 degrees C)

3 tablespoons butter

1 tablespoon instant powdered milk

1/4 cup white sugar

3/8 teaspoon salt

1 egg

1 egg white

3 cups all-purpose flour

1 tablespoon active dry yeast

3/4 cup currants

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1 egg yolk

2 tablespoons water

1/2 cup confectioners' sugar

1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract

2 teaspoons milk

1. Put warm water, butter, skim milk powder, 1/4 cup sugar, salt, egg, egg white, flour, and yeast in bread maker and start on dough program.

2. When 5 minutes of kneading are left, add currants and cinnamon. Leave until dough is double in size (about 1 hour).

3. Punch down on floured surface, cover, and let rest 10 minutes.

4. Shape into 12 balls and place in a greased 9 x 12 inch pan. Cover and let rise in a warm place till double, about 35-40 minutes.

5. Mix egg yolk and 2 tablespoons water. Brush on balls.

6. Bake at 375 degrees F (190 degrees C) for 20 minutes. Remove from pan immediately and cool on wire rack.

7. To make crosses: mix together confectioners' sugar, vanilla, and milk. Brush an "X" on each cooled bun.

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