Snapshot of Ipswich's history unveiled

A SNAPSHOT of Ipswich's history is continuing to be unveiled today by an archeological dig at its waterfront.Work to uncover the foundations of a medieval building is due to be completed by the end of November.

A SNAPSHOT of Ipswich's history is continuing to be unveiled today by an archeological dig at its waterfront.

Work to uncover the foundations of a medieval building is due to be completed by the end of November.

The remnants, holding secrets from a bygone era, were found in July below the old Cranfield Mill, which is due to be demolished to make way for a £30million development.

Suffolk County Council's archaeological services department has spent months unearthing the 15th century remains.

Dave Gill, project officer for the council, said: "We have completely uncovered the foundations of the house now and have found the cellar floor.

It is amazing to see the whole layout of the house and it is an important find as we don't normally find remains from this period.

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"The building would have fronted College Street and extended back to the quayside. It would have been 20 metres wide and run along College Street for 25 metres."

The dig will be completed in five weeks time and will make way for the demolition of the former mill.

When the building has come down the diggers will move back in and carry out another dig underneath it.

Mr Gill believes the house was probably occupied by a wealthy merchant who may have worked at Framlingham castle or who operated the quay.

He added: "By the end of it we should have a complete picture of what the complex would have looked like.

"The foundations will not be brought up and after they have been documented they will be kept under the new development."

Developers Wharfside said the historic find did not come as a surprise and will not delay plans.

Brian Tanner, a director of the company, said plans for the new building were changed to make sure the foundations could be preserved the best it can.

He said: "The find is under the proposed courtyard, which will not be built upon during the development and should ensure the remains are kept intact. We will have to amend one or two foundations, though.

"It will not delay things as we are trying to conclude the dig by the end of the year. Work will then be able to start on the development in January."

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