SnOasis traffic study defended

A TRAFFIC study into the impact of the proposed SnOasis development on Suffolk's roads has been defended at a public inquiry today.On day seven of the inquiry into the development, Andy Jenkinson, transport consultant for the applicants, said it was likely people would travel to the destination in cars in groups of three, four or five.

A TRAFFIC study into the impact of the proposed SnOasis development on Suffolk's roads has been defended at a public inquiry today.

On day seven of the inquiry into the development, Andy Jenkinson, transport consultant for the applicants, said it was likely people would travel to the destination in cars in groups of three, four or five. He said many others would take the train.

However he was challenged by William Upton representing SnOasis Community Alliance, who argued that many people would travel to SnOasis in cars on their own, increasing the amount of daily traffic on roads.

He added that people would be reluctant to use the train to visit the centre as it's more costly than driving.

Mr Upton said: “If people in Ipswich are wanting to use the facilities of SnOasis are you saying they will only go with a group of friends? Surely they will get in the car and go on their own. Isn't ski equipment bulky and won't they put it in the car rather than having a passenger?”

The inquiry at Ipswich Corn Exchange is being carried out into the SnOasis scheme which, if given the go-ahead, could see a ski-slope, a four-star hotel, 350 chalets, 100 new apartments and many new jobs at Great Blakenham.

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There has been uproar among residents in the area who are concerned about the traffic and environmental impact of the scheme.

But Mr Jenkinson said that leisure activities tend to be done in groups.

He said replied: “Skiing in particular is very much a group activity. Most people who ski will have a roof rack and will not use up the space of other passengers.”

He added that people would use the train to visit SnOasis as cost is not the only factor people use when deciding how to travel.

Mr Jenkinson said: “If you're on the train you can have a drink at the bar or a meal on the way. It's an enjoyable way of starting a holiday break. The operator will be working hard to promote options for transport travel to make sure model splits are obtained.”