Soldiers' non-stop 150 mile charity run

TWO former soldiers will finally get the chance to rest their aching limbs today after a non-stop 150 mile run for charity - the equivalent of nearly six marathons back to back.

TWO former soldiers will finally get the chance to rest their aching limbs today after a non-stop 150 mile run for charity - the equivalent of nearly six marathons back to back.

Steve Morris and Bob Chatterton, former members if 9 Parachute Squadron, Royal Engineers, were due to end their run at Rock Barracks in Woodbridge this morning after setting out from the squadron's former base in Aldershot on Saturday.

Mr Morris, 47 from Aldershot and Mr Chatterton, 45 from Basingstoke took on the brutal challenge to raise more than �2,000 for the Forces charity, Help for Heroes.

Leaving their former base at 6pm on Saturday the pair were hoping to arrive at Rocks Barracks, where the squadron now form part of 23 Engineer Regiment (Air Assualt), at around 9am this morning.

With just a few hours left of their gruelling task, Mr Morris took time out to speak to The Evening Star while they were en route and said they were looking forward to getting breakfast, putting their feet up and having a bath.

He said: “Our feet are in bits. It has been a lot harder than we thought it would be, partly because of the fact our feet are really hurting and our legs are so stiff.”

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And the inspiration behind the run was to do their bit for the soldiers serving now.

Mr Morris added: “It was Bob's idea; we do a lot of running and ultra-distances anyway so I thought why not?

“This links the old home of the Squadron with the new and we have a number of veterans running with us at different stages to show their support.

“And there will be some of the new guys there meeting us in a couple of hours to walk us in.

“This is the longest distance I have ever run, and although I don't think I will be doing this particular route again, we have got another ultra-marathon, 70km in Germany in just 18 days time.”

Mr Chatterton's father, also called Bob, accompanied the runners in a Black London taxi to ensure they had all the back-up their needed during their monumental feat.