Through the Lens: Face painting tales

Jessica Overbury, six, and Lucy MacKenzie, five, dance around at Foxburrow Farms annual Apple Day

Jessica Overbury, six, and Lucy MacKenzie, five, dance around at Foxburrow Farms annual Apple Day - Credit: Archant

“Apple feasts, Christmas fayres and school fetes are a few of the events we photographers get sent to cover on a regular basis,” said Su Anderson this week.

“Face painting is a common part of these events ranging from simple hearts and moustaches to highly skilled artistic creations. A child with a painted face is much more likely to get in a photograph as it makes them stick out and also because of the cuteness factor.”

Explaining what draws her attention, Su continued: “Most children look really intense when they are getting their faces painted but the smile usually comes when the mirror is handed to them and they get to see themselves as superheroes or animals.

“But face painting isn’t just for kids. I photograph a ton of charity events where grown-ups get just as involved with disguising themselves.”

• Tip- As with any subject, ask permission before photographing the person having their face painted but also ask the person who is doing the painting if they are OK being in the photo, even if it is just their hands. A

lso try and wait for a shot of them looking in the mirror- you can get behind them and get their hand holding the mirror and their reflection for an artistic photo.