Woman died after missing medicine

A SUFFOLK father has issued a heart-felt warning about the dangers of not taking prescribed medicines after his daughter suffered a fatal seizure.

A SUFFOLK father has issued a heart-felt warning about the dangers of not taking prescribed medicines after his daughter suffered a fatal seizure.

Keith Baker said his daughter Vicky might have still been alive today if she had not ignored medical advice to take a prescription drug for her epilepsy.

Speaking after her inquest at Ipswich Crown Court yesterday, he warned people the consequences of not treating serious conditions could be fatal.

“Take your medication if it is prescribed to you because it is done for a purpose.

“If she had of taken it she might have still been here today,” he said.

He will reiterate his message at a special concert to be held in memory of his 26-year-old daughter at the Corn Exchange in Ipswich on Saturday.

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Greater Suffolk Coroner Peter Dean ruled Ipswich resident Ms Baker had died as a result of sudden, unexpected complications with her epilepsy condition on January 28.

The inquest heard the care worker had suffered a fit a month before her death but had chose to ignore countless letters from her GP to have a check up and refused to take any of the medication that had been prescribed for her condition.

Mr Barker had gone round to his daughter's flat in Park Road, Ipswich on January 28 after being concerned she was not answering his calls. He found her body in her bed and an ambulance crew confirmed her death.

A post mortem examination, carried out by consultant pathologist Dr Nat Cary, showed no evidence of the drug which she was supposed to be taking for her diagnosis.

Mr Baker took to the witness stand in a bid to urge the public to learn form his daughter's mistake.

He also thanked people for the “huge turnout” at her funeral.

Dr Dean said: “We must pay heed to the important comments made by Mr Baker.”

He added of Victoria's fatal attack: “This is a natural process but the tragic outcome might have been averted.”

She had been prescribed medication to control seizures after diagnosis four years ago. However, her family have revealed she loathed the notion of taking medicine for the rest of her life and unbeknown to them stopped taking the pills after little more than a year - after a period without fits.

Her parents said all the funds raised from Saturday evening's concert at the Corn Exchange will go to charity Epilepsy Action.

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