Hot Stuff is raring to go

SPEEDWAY: Ipswich Witches winter signing Leigh Lanham was back in action today, proving that he can be Hot Stuff on and off the speedway track. The Lanham family fish and chip shop in Reynolds Road, Ipswich, has reopened after suffering a fire last October.

By Elvin King

IPSWICH Witches winter signing Leigh Lanham was back in action today, proving that he can be Hot Stuff on and off the speedway track.

The Lanham family fish and chip shop in Reynolds Road, Ipswich, has reopened after suffering a fire last October.

His father, former Witches' rider Mike, Leigh and his mechanic brother, Nikki, all work in a shop that is a big hit in the Gainsborough area of town.

"The shop is called Hot Stuff and this is what I plan to be this season," said Lanham, who often spends time peeling potatoes and helping out at the takeaway.

Lanham will be alternating between riding at reserve for Ipswich in the Sky Sports Elite League and taking his place as heat leader for Arena-Essex in the Premier League.

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It should turn into a lucrative year and Lanham's potential overall earnings outstrip those of an Elite League superstar.

He intends to be up for the task of riding 60 plus competitive meetings in 2002. He goes into hospital on January 25 to have a metal pin removed from his thigh following a crash in early season 2000.

This forced him on to the sidelines for almost 12 months.

"It should take me about two weeks to recover from the operation," said Lanham. "I am training for two hours every day and plan to be in tip-top shape for the start of the season.

"And peeling potatoes keeps me in trim."

Lanham's riding year got off to a good start in the New Year outdoor meeting at Newport on January 6.

He was challenging for first place with eventual winner Michael Coles on the final corner of the final.

He came off and, although unscathed, was rather unlucky to be excluded.

Former Ipswich rider Ben Howe made his comeback in that meeting after a long lay-off with a troublesome arm injury.

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