Legacy of War photograph exhibition at University of Suffolk aims to encourage empathy for refugees

Photographs from the Legacy of War exhibition to be displayed at the University of Suffolk. Picture:

Photographs from the Legacy of War exhibition to be displayed at the University of Suffolk. Picture: GILES DULEY/UNHCR - Credit: Archant

Photographs depicting the “painful” experiences of refugees will go on display in Ipswich to remind viewers of the human cost of conflict.

Part of the Legacy of War exhibition to be displayed at the University of Suffolk. Picture: GILES DU

Part of the Legacy of War exhibition to be displayed at the University of Suffolk. Picture: GILES DULEY/UNHCR - Credit: Archant

The exhibition will be presented at the University of Suffolk’s Waterfront building, in collaboration with charity Suffolk Refugee Support, from April 25 to May 21.

The images were taken by internationally acclaimed photographer Giles Duley, who has spent more than a decade documenting the lasting effects of battle on civilians and communities as part of his ‘Legacy of War’ project, which is backed by the United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR).

In 2011 Duley’s work was put on hold when he stepped on a bomb in Afghanistan and lost both his legs and an arm.

The University of Suffolk is staging a Legacy of War photographic exhibition. Picture: GILES DULEY/U

The University of Suffolk is staging a Legacy of War photographic exhibition. Picture: GILES DULEY/UNHCR - Credit: Archant

The ordeal has left Duley more determined than ever to tell the personal stories of those caught up in war and devastation.


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Martin Simmonds, of Suffolk Refugee Support, said: “These are powerful images capturing painful human experiences.

“We hope the exhibition will improve awareness of the issues affecting refugees and asylum seekers across the world, and here in Suffolk - issues of trauma, hardship and hope.”

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Duley said he was “delighted” his images were being shown in Ipswich.

He added: “The refugee crisis affects all of us – it’s a global crisis that needs global solutions. I also think it’s a moment in the history of our humanity in terms of how we deal with it. I hope I can act as a witness and share the stories of those I meet – at a time when there is a lot of fear, misunderstanding and misinformation; empathy has never felt more vital.”

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