Life is about taking chances says singer Christina Martin, at St Peter’s by the Waterfront, Ipswich, this Friday.

Canadian singer-songwriter Christina Martin performs at St Peter's by the Waterfront in Ipswich

Canadian singer-songwriter Christina Martin performs at St Peter's by the Waterfront in Ipswich - Credit: Archant

Canadian singer Christina Martin belives you should always take chances in life, learn from the mistakes you make and always challenge yourself if you want to grow - that’s exactly what she did with latest album It’ll Be Alright.

Canadian singer-songwriter Christina Martin performs at St Peter's by the Waterfront in Ipswich

Canadian singer-songwriter Christina Martin performs at St Peter's by the Waterfront in Ipswich - Credit: Archant

“All of my albums are very personal. With this album I pushed for an energy and overall classic pop-rock sound. I wanted to make a record that reflected more of the music and artists I grew up loving; Eurythmics, David Bowie, Tom Petty. The motivation is always the freedom to express myself, make a connection, and to become a better entertainer, singer and songwriter.”

Born in Florida and raised in Canada, her musical journey since her first release in 2002 has led to extended stays in Texas and Germany, earning her a legion of followers across mainland Europe. Along the way, she has earned multiple East Coast and Music Nova Scotia Awards, had songs featured on numerous TV soundtracks and even performed for the Queen at the Winter Olympics opening ceremony.

She’s performing at Ipswich’s St Peter’s by the Waterfront from 7.30pm on March 18 as part of her biggest UK tour yet. It coincides with the release of new single You Ran From Me; the video for which was shot on location in Novia Scotia.

“I naively thought it would be a good idea to shoot on two of our coldest Canadian winter days. This made for much cursing on my part and perhaps I was a bit more difficult for the crew to work with, but it was worth it. This video gives me a chance to show where I’m from, and also a bit of an insight into an old equestrian passion of mine.”

Canadian singer-songwriter Christina Martin performs at St Peter's by the Waterfront in Ipswich

Canadian singer-songwriter Christina Martin performs at St Peter's by the Waterfront in Ipswich - Credit: Archant

It’s the third track taken from her acclaimed 2015 album It’ll Be Alright, produced by her husband Dale Murray. Many people would be wary of working with their other half.

“Dale is pretty cool to work with. I’d say he’s worth every penny,” says Martin.

People always talk about the difficult second album. Now on her fifth, it doesn’t always get easier.

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“Certain things about making music get easier, after years of making it a priority and playing. But there are days I still feel I have no idea what I’m doing. At the moment, what I find the most difficult is finding the resources to keep the business running and therefore have time and resources so I can write and record.

“Of course it’s easier now making music because I have a studio in my home and my husband is a talented engineer, musician and producer. But the details involved in recording and then launching and executing a successful business plan are overwhelming sometimes.”

It’ll Be Alright has been described as her most accessible album to date. She made a conscious effort to not be bound by expectations of those who categorised her as an alt-country artist.

“Since I started writing songs when I lived in Austin, Texas; I was introduced at that time to Americana music and alt-country. So it makes sense when I start writing a new song by default I write with a sort-of Americana singing and songwriting style. I’m a fan of singer-songwriters like Shawn Colvin, Patty Griffin, Steve Early, Townes Van Zandt.”

However, the music she grew up with sounds and feels a bit different and Martin’s really drawn to rock rhythms so wanted to find songs that would fit nicely together on a more “classic” pop-rock sounding album.

“My father and MTV turned me on to many types of music growing up, but I am probably more driven towards pop and classic rock. Going into this record, we were clear that we wanted a bigger, anthemic sound overall. Each song needed to say something that would resonate with a larger audience.

“I don’t care what people think in terms of labels or genres, but personally I did want to try for an album that sounded different than my albums in the past overall, which meant spending more time trying tempos and rhythms, focusing on beautiful and catchy hooks and obsessing over the messages and vocal treatments and parts.

“The result of putting more time and thought into this album, I believe, is the kind of record I wish I had made in the beginning. There were songs that didn’t make the cut for this record. I wanted songs on this album that would transfer to bigger stages.

“I still play many solo and duo shows and at these shows it’s more difficult to play the songs on It’ll Be Alright as they were recorded. I think that’s fine and it’s a nice change as an artist to be able to adapt to the performance-stage-band situation.”

Martin’s looking forward to her biggest UK tour so far.

“Definitely! We’re staying longer which means I have more time to connect with fans and media on the ground and see new places. I’m a bit worried that I won’t get much sleep. I am hoping for a great tour so I can come back soon.”

She wil also be at The Portland Arms, Cambridge, March 17; Little Rabbit Barn, Ardleigh, March 19 and The Bicycle Shop, Norwich, March 21. Visit www.christinamartin.net for more details.

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