Omid wows them at the Regent

FORMER England boss Steve McClaren sounding like a Nigerian - it doesn't sound very clever, does it? But it worked.When Omid Djalili tried to do politics, however, it didn't.

FORMER England boss Steve McClaren sounding like a Nigerian - it doesn't sound very clever, does it? But it worked.

When Omid Djalili tried to do politics, however, it didn't.

You would expect a British-born Iranian talking about terrorism in an age of international turmoil to have something to say.

But the burly Djalili's take on world affairs wasn't original.

It was when he allowed his mind to settle on ordinary life that he was much funnier.

From describing a Nigerian parking attendant's racially-charged argument with ex-footballer Ian Wright, to jeering Norwich, Ipswich's East Anglian rivals, Djalili got more laughs when he talked about everyday life.

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And that Nigerian accent, which got ever stronger - he couldn't stop doing it and the audience loved it.

They loved his show too, despite the fact that his complaints about George W. Bush and Britain's relationship with America seemed old hat.

But Djalili's style, to switch from thinking about international politics to gently mocking the self-image of the English, left him searching for some kind of rhythm.

He could go from being topical - last week's earthquake was “very British”, rather than fleeing our homes we stayed indoors and watched it on television, - to talking about hatred between Arabs and Jews.

It didn't quite fit together, but Djalili was still popular. Even when he dared to slag off Ipswich, the audience forgave him.

But the show felt like two scripts knitted together - Djalili should pick one.

Peter Edwards.

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